Monthly Financing

Warranty Coverage

Free Design Service

Search
Close this search box.

Green Wave Distribution

Search
Close this search box.

How Much Electricity Does the Average Household Use? By State [2024]

Key Notes

  • On average, US households consume 893kWh of power per month.
  • The main influencing factors are home size, occupancy, climate, and appliance efficiency.
  • Heating and cooling accounts for almost half of a household’s power usage.
  • Louisiana is the highest consumer, averaging 1,191kWh per month.
  • Hawaii uses the least energy on average at 518kWh per month.

What’s the US Average?

Wondering how many watt-hours of electricity the average American uses daily? 

The answer is around 29,767 watt-hours (or 29.8 kWh) of electricity.

Statewide Electricity Consumption Comparison

The average household electricity consumption in the United States varies significantly by state, primarily due to differences in utility costs, climate, household size, energy efficiency measures, and the type of heating and cooling systems used.

On a national level, it equates to about 10,715 kWh a year,  which translates to around 893 kWh per household per month​. 

Here’s a quick breakdown of the average amount of power each state uses on a monthly basis, from highest to lowest:

StateAverage Monthly Consumption (kWh)
Louisiana1,191
Mississippi1,174
Texas1,174
Arkansas1,153
Alabama1,141
Kentucky1,131
Oklahoma1,127
Tennessee1,128
Florida1,088
North Dakota1,091
North Carolina1,080
South Carolina1,081
Arizona1,072
Georgia1,070
Virginia1,048
West Virginia1,035
Missouri1,026
Indiana1,010
Maryland1,005
Nebraska1,005
Delaware977
Washington969
South Dakota986
Nevada924
Idaho949
StateAverage Monthly Consumption (kWh)
Kansas908
Oregon916
Iowa911
Montana850
Wyoming867
Ohio874
Pennsylvania858
Minnesota767
Utah742
Illinois745
New Jersey687
Colorado687
Connecticut692
Wisconsin692
Michigan648
New Mexico655
New Hampshire627
Massachusetts596
Alaska590
Rhode Island585
New York572
Vermont565
California546
Maine551
Hawaii518

Factors Influencing Electricity Usage

Where you live, how big your house is, and the age of the main power-consuming appliances in your home all influence how much energy you use in a month.

1. Home Size and Occupancy

Large homes typically use more electricity as the living spaces needing heating, cooling, and lighting are bigger. This is especially true for homes with multiple levels. 

Similarly, households with more occupants tend to consume more energy because more people are using lighting, electronics and appliances, like hairdryers, phone chargers and dishwashers.

2. Climate and Weather Patterns

electricity usage

Climate and weather patterns play a significant role in electrical usage. Regions with extreme temperatures usually have higher power bills due to the increased need for heating and cooling. 

For example, homes in the South and West regions of the US generally consume more electricity than those in milder climates, as they require more energy to cool and heat their homes.

3. Appliance Efficiency

The type and efficiency of appliances in a home significantly affect energy consumption. 

Older appliances tend to be less energy-efficient compared to newer models that often have energy-saving features. For instance, an old refrigerator can consume up to twice as much electricity as a modern energy-efficient model.

What Uses the Most Electricity in Your Home?

Most of your electricity bill is made up of heating and cooling costs. But what other factors should you consider? Here’s a quick breakdown before we get into the details:

Climate control is the main energy consumer in most households.
AppliancePercentage of Home's Energy Use
Heating and Cooling47%
- Air Conditioning12%
- Space Heating32%
Water Heating14%
Refrigerators4%
Lighting3-9%
Washers and Dryers3-9%
Electric Ovens and Stoves4%
Media Equipment3%
Dishwashers2%
Computers1%

1. Heating and Cooling

radiant heat panels

Heating and cooling systems are the largest consumers of electricity in the average US home, accounting for nearly half of the total energy use. This includes air conditioning, space heating, and water heating.

Air Conditioning

Air conditioning, in particular, has seen a significant increase in usage, with 89% of homes now using it compared to just 57% in 1980. This surge in AC usage is especially prevalent in the South, where the warmer climate calls for more cooling.

Space Heating

Space heating, often powered by electricity, also contributes significantly to energy consumption, especially in colder regions where indoor heating or where radiant heat panels are used regularly to keep your home warm.

Want To Save Big On Your Heating Bills?

Browse our energy-efficient floor-heating solutions

Water Heating

Water heating can account for up to 18% of a home’s electricity usage through appliances such as geysers. Deicing products that are convenient for cold climates, like heated driveways, can also raise your electrical bill if they are not properly installed and maintained. 

2. Refrigerators

All modern homes have refrigerators, which are the biggest energy users in kitchens, as they operate 24/7.

3. Lighting

A study by the US Department of Energy found that the average American home uses around 1,700 kWh of electricity per year for lighting, with each lamp in your house burning for approximately 1.6 hours a day. 

Here, lamp type plays an important role, as compact fluorescent lamps consume more energy than incandescent lamps. In addition, homes with higher-wattage lamps tend to consume more energy.

4. Washers and Dryers

Washers are typically energy-intensive with an average annual energy consumption of around 1,000 kWh. This is due to the high power needed to operate the motor, pump, and heating elements.

5. Electric Ovens and Stoves

The average electric stove or oven in the United States uses 875 kWh in a year, which is about 73 kWh of electricity per month. 

This means that running an electric stove for one hour a day could cost between $21.60 and $29.60 per month or between $259.20 and $355.20 per year, assuming an average electricity rate of $0.13 per kWh.

6. Media Equipment

The electrical consumption of your media equipment varies widely, depending on how much you use it. 

For example, watching an average of five hours of TV daily and playing video games for about six hours a week uses about 55 kWh of electricity per month. 

Additionally, these devices often use standby power even when not in use, which can contribute to increased energy consumption.

7. Dishwashers

When using the average dishwasher, you’re consuming about 1,800 watts of power per cycle. This translates to an average of 1.8 kWh of electricity per cycle, although this varies depending on the size of your dishwasher and the number of washes per week.

8. Computers

When using the average dishwasher, you’re consuming about 1,800 watts of power per cycle. This translates to an average of 1.8 kWh of electricity per cycle, although this varies depending on the size of your dishwasher and the number of washes per week.

Regional Variations

Bear in mind that higher monthly electrical bills don’t equate to higher usage, as the cost of electricity varies significantly from one state to another. 

For instance, Hawaii has the lowest energy consumption in the US but pays the highest price per kWh. This is because of its remote location and reliance on imported fuels. 

If you want to know how much you’re paying for power in your state, scan the table below:

StateCost per kWh (2024)Average Monthly
Consumption (kWh)
Average Monthly
Cost ($)
Hawaii$0.43518$222.74
California$0.28546$152.88
Connecticut$0.26692$179.92
Rhode Island$0.25585$146.25
Massachusetts$0.25596$149.00
Alaska$0.24590$141.60
New York$0.23572$131.56
New Hampshire$0.22627$137.94
Vermont$0.22565$124.30
Maine$0.22551$121.22
New Jersey$0.18687$123.66
Michigan$0.18648$116.64
Wisconsin$0.17692$117.64
Maryland$0.161,005$160.80
Pennsylvania$0.16858$137.28
Ohio$0.15874$131.10
Illinois$0.15745$111.75
Delaware$0.14977$136.78
Florida$0.141,088$152.32
Georgia$0.141,070$149.80
North Carolina$0.141,080$151.20
South Carolina$0.141,081$151.34
Virginia$0.141,048$146.72
Nevada$0.13924$120.12
Colorado$0.13687$89.31
Minnesota$0.13767$99.71
Arizona$0.131,072$139.36
New Mexico$0.13655$85.15
Utah$0.12742$89.04
Oregon$0.12916$109.92
Washington$0.12969$116.28
Idaho$0.11949$104.39
Montana$0.11850$93.50
Wyoming$0.11867$95.37
Indiana$0.111,010$111.10
Kansas$0.11908$99.88
Missouri$0.111,026$112.86
Texas$0.111,174$129.14
Louisiana$0.111,191$131.01
Oklahoma$0.111,127$123.97
Kentucky$0.111,131$124.41
Arkansas$0.111,153$126.83
Alabama$0.111,141$125.51
Tennessee$0.111,128$124.08
West Virginia$0.111,035$113.85
Mississippi$0.101,174$117.40
North Dakota$0.101,091$109.10
Nebraska$0.101,005$100.50
Iowa$0.10911$91.10
South Dakota$0.10986$98.60

Emerging Technologies

As the price of living increases and we become more aware of our carbon footprint, certain trends are emerging around energy usage.

Smart Appliances and Outlets

These monitor and automatically control electricity usage, and their popularity is on the rise. 

Smart thermostats, for instance, learn a home’s temperature preferences and adjust the heating and cooling accordingly, ensuring optimal energy efficiency. They also detect when nobody is home and change the temperature to conserve energy.

Radiant Floor Heating

Radiant heating can potentially cut your energy consumption by 20 to 40% as it eliminates inefficiencies found in duct work and ensures minimal heat loss.

Energy Harvesting and Self-Powering Wearable Devices

Revolutionizing how we manage energy consumption, these devices harness kinetic energy from human motion, solar energy, and thermal energy to power wearable devices that you can use to charge items like USB power sockets.

Tips for Reducing Electricity Usage

Energy Audit

  • An energy audit will pinpoint where your home is losing electricity and suggest improvements.

Home Improvements

Energy-Saving Habits

  • Switch off lights and devices when not in use.

Energy-Efficient Products

  • Upgrade to energy-efficient appliances by looking for appliances with the Energy Star label, indicating higher efficiency standards. And, choose products with smart features like eco-modes and timers for optimized energy usage.
  • Replace traditional incandescent bulbs with LED bulbs. They use significantly less energy and can last up to 25 times longer.

Frequently Asked Questions

How many kWh does a 2000 sq ft house use on average?

The average electricity consumption of a 2,000 sq ft house in America is approximately 1,000 to 2,000 kWh per month. This translates to around 30 to 60 kWh per day.

Will reducing the temperature of my hot water tank significantly affect my power usage?

Yes, reducing the temperature of your hot water tank to 120 degrees Fahrenheit will save on your power consumption. For every 10-degree reduction, you can save between 3% and 5% on your water heating costs.

Final Flicker

Remember, your power usage isn’t just about the numbers on your bill – it’s about how you live in your home. By understanding where your electricity goes, you can make smarter choices about energy use without sacrificing comfort.

From smart thermostats to energy-efficient appliances, there are plenty of ways to cut your energy consumption and your bills. And don’t forget about innovative heating solutions like radiant floor heating, which can cut your energy use by up to 40%.

Ready to take control of your home’s energy use and stay cozy at the same time? Have a look at our heating solutions to keep your home warm while saving on energy bills. It’s time to power up your savings and power down your usage.